Vroman's is OPEN for in-store shopping & curbside pick-up seven days a week.
FREE DOMESTIC SHIPPING ON ORDERS OVER $100!

Romance Object Clitics: Microvariation and Linguistic Change (Oxford Studies in Diachronic and Historical Linguistics) (Hardcover)

×

Warning message

Mean Menu style requires jQuery library version 1.7 or higher, but you have opted to provide your own library. Please ensure you have the proper version of jQuery included. (note: this is not an error)
Romance Object Clitics: Microvariation and Linguistic Change (Oxford Studies in Diachronic and Historical Linguistics) Cover Image
$100.00
Add to Wish List
Usually arrives at our store within 4-7 days

Description


This book offers an empirical and theoretical exploration of the development of object clitic pronouns in the Romance languages, drawing on data from Latin, medieval vernaculars, modern Romance languages, and lesser-known dialects. Diego Pescarini examines phonological, morphological, and
especially syntactic aspects of Romance object clitics, using the findings to reconstruct their evolution from Latin to Romance and to model clitic placement in modern Romance languages. On the theoretical side, the volume engages with previous accounts of clitics, particularly in generative theory.
It challenges the received idea that cliticization resulted from a form of syntactic deficiency; instead, it proposes that clitics resulted from the feature endowment of discourse features, which initially caused freezing of certain pronominal forms and then - through reanalysis - their successive
incorporation to verbal hosts. This approach leads to a revision of earlier analyses of well-known phenomena such as interpolation, climbing, and enclisis/proclisis alternations, and to new approaches to issues including V2 syntax, scrambling, and stylistic fronting, among many others.
Product Details
ISBN: 9780198864387
ISBN-10: 0198864388
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
Publication Date: May 25th, 2021
Pages: 352
Language: English
Series: Oxford Studies in Diachronic and Historical Linguistics